The Finally Fall Book Tag: 2021 Edition

Its Book Tag time. What better way to enjoy my favourite season than with an autumn themed tag? It’s Finally Fall! This tag was created by Alina on her booktube channel Tall Tales.

It’s become something of a tradition on the blog to complete this tag each year; I’ve done it at least a couple of times before, but I always think there’s still room for another autumn-themed post, so here it is, same tag, new books. The 2021 edition of the Finally Fall Book Tag…

In fall, the air is crisp and clear: Name a book with a vivid setting.

GodsofJadeandShadow     DevilandtheDarkWater

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia. The world of Casiopea was really vibrant and colourful and a complete contrast to Xiabalba, the home of Hun-Kamé. Both came to vivid life in this book.

The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton. A story set on a ship bound on a long journey and possibly plagued by something supernatural, I loved the atmosphere of this story and some of that was down to the setting, all those people being confined together on the ship.

Nature is beautiful… but also dying: Name a book that is beautifully written, but also deals with a heavy topic like loss or grief.

WizardandGlass

Wizard and Glass (The Dark Tower #4) goes into Roland’s backstory and without giving too much away there is definitely loss involved.

Fall is back to school season: Share a non-fiction book that taught you something new.

I feel like I give the same answer each time I do this tag but I haven’t read any non-fiction this year… yet.

In order to keep warm, it’s good to spend some time with the people we love: Name a fictional family/household/friend-group that you’d like to be a part of.

Gunslinger DrawingoftheThree WasteLands WizardandGlass

Given my Dark Tower reread is ongoing this year I can’t not say Roland’s ka-tet for this. Travelling around Mid-World with Roland, Jake, Eddie, Susannah and Oy would definitely be quite exciting.

The colourful leaves are piling up on the ground: Show us a pile of fall-colored spines!

I can offer up some autumnish-colour-inspired covers?

NOS4A2 Gunslinger Later

Naturalist AllMyDarkestImpulses CirclingTheDrain

FogDescending LoveTheWayYouLie SecretHistory

Fall is the perfect time for some storytelling by the fireside: Share a book wherein somebody is telling a story.

SecretHistory     Later

The Secret History by Donna Tartt.  Richard Papen recounts his time at Hampden, attending college, becoming involved with a group of Classics students, and his involvement in the murder of one of his classmates.

Later by Stephen King.  Jamie Conklin can see and communicate with the recently deceased, and tells this story of events that occur once other people become aware of his talent. I thought Jamie was a great character and a really good narrator.

The nights are getting darker: Share a dark, creepy read.

NOS4A2 AllMyDarkestImpulses CirclingTheDrain

FogDescending LoveTheWayYouLie

NOS4A2 by Joe Hill featuring Charlie Manx and his Rolls Royce Wraith taking unsuspecting people off to Chrstmasland was pretty creepy.

House of Crows by Lisa Unger is a series of four short stories linked together to make a series about a group of childhood friends drawn back to an old estate where they shared a summer and where something happened that draws them back. Definitely had some creepy moments.

The days are getting colder: Name a short, heartwarming read that could warm up somebody’s cold and rainy day.

ThisIsHowYouLosetheTimeWar

This Is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone. The writing is lovely and the story ventures through time and space.

Fall returns every year: Name an old favorite that you’d like to return to soon.

I’ve been thinking recently that I’d like to reread Fingersmith by Sarah Waters. It’s been a long time since I read it the first time, must have been pre-blogging days because I never wrote about it here, so I’d like to go back and experience the story again.

Fall is the perfect time for cozy reading nights: Share your favorite cozy reading “accessories”!

A massive mug of tea, or possibly coffee, and some chocolate biscuits.

Spread the autumn appreciation and tag some people!

As always, if you’ve not had chance to do this tag yet, or you’re seeing it for the first time and fancy giving it a go please consider yourself tagged.

The Mid-Year Freak Out Book Tag: 2021 Edition

It’s Book Tag time.

It’s that time of year; I’ve spotted this tag around quite often recently so yes, the Mid-Year period is here again.
I’ve enjoyed many of my recent reads, so here’s to remembering a few of them in the Mid-Year Freak Out Book Tag.

1. Best book you’ve read so far in 2021:

I’ve read some great books so far this year so I don’t think I can pick just one for this. I must mention…

DevilandtheDarkWater TenThousandDoorsOfJanuary NOS4A2

Gunslinger DrawingoftheThree WasteLands

The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton
The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow
NOS4A2 by Joe Hill
The Gunslinger, The Drawing of the Three, and The Waste Lands – the first three volumes of the Dark Tower series by Stephen King

2. Best sequel of 2021 so far:

DrawingoftheThree
The Drawing of the Three by Stephen King. It’s the second Dark Tower book and really starts to draw everything together after the Gunslinger, a much shorter novel that only really features Roland, the Man in Black and Jake.

3. New release you haven’t read yet, but want to:

The Shape of Darkness by Laura Purcell is one I definitely want to read but I’m thinking I might save it for my Autumn TBR list, if I can resist that long.

4. Most anticipated release of the second half of 2021:

Billy Summers by Stephen King

5. Biggest disappointment of 2021:

That I haven’t read a few more books so far, I’m still reading quite slowly and there are so many books I want to read.

6. Biggest surprise:

Naturalist Later ThisIsHowYouLosetheTimeWar

The Naturalist by Andrew Mayne was something a bit different for me and went off in surprising directions that made for exciting reading.

Later by Stephen King was another good one.

This Is How You Lose The Time War by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone – I enjoyed this so much that I want to read more books like it.

7. Favourite new author (debut or new to you):

TenThousandDoorsOfJanuary

New-to-me – Alix E. Harrow with The Ten Thousand Doors of January. I can’t believe I waited so long to read it.

8. Newest fictional crush:

Still drawing a blank on this one…

9. Newest favourite character:

DevilandtheDarkWater

This is a tie between Arent Hayes and Sara Wessell in The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton. I liked them both separately, and having them team up to deal with what is going on aboard the Saardam made for some great reading.

10. Book that made you cry:

WasteLands

There was one moment during The Waste Lands by Stephen King that made me just a tiny bit emotional. It was a reunion, and one I’d been looking forward to. I’ll say no more.

11. Book that made you happy:

GodsofJadeandShadow

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia.

12. Favourite book to movie adaptation of 2021 you’ve seen:

It’s not a movie but I’ve recently watched the TV series of Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King. It’s a while since I read the Bill Hodges trilogy and I enjoyed the tv versions of the characters.

13. Favourite Post/review you’ve written this year:

Gunslinger DrawingoftheThree WasteLands

I’m enjoying writing about my Dark Tower reread. It was only when I started considering a series reread that I discovered I hadn’t already written about these books, possibly because I read them in my pre-blogging days.

Top Ten Tuesday has also given opportunities for some fun-to-write posts too. A few I’ve enjoyed included…

New-to-Me Authors of 2020

The Colours of Mardi Gras (covers edition)

Books That Made Me Want to Read More Like Them

14. Most beautiful book you bought or received this year:

TenThousandDoorsOfJanuary

The Ten Thousand Doors of January has a lovely cover and the story was pretty magical too.

15. Books you need to read by the end of this year:

There are many, many books I could mention here but I’ll just mention a few or I’d have a whole post filled with my tbr list…

More of the Dark Tower series by Stephen King
Piranesi by Susanna Clarke
The One and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow
A Deadly Education by Naomi Novik

So concludes my 2021 edition of The Mid-Year Freak Out Book Tag.


As always, if you’ve not already done this and you fancy reminiscing over the amazing books you’ve read so far this year, feel free to consider yourself tagged.
See you next time for another Book Tag!

The End Of The Year Book Tag: 2020 Edition

It’s Book Tag time!
I’ve completed this tag in previous years and thought it would be fun to revisit it again now, so let’s talk books…

Are there any books you started this year that you need to finish?

At the moment there isn’t anything outstanding other than whatever I happen to be reading at the time.
I recently started reading The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman which is the first book in a series, so I might try and read at least one more of those before the end of the year, and there are a couple of other books I would like to try and read which I’ll mention later in this post.

Do you have an autumnal book to transition into the end of the year?

Not specifically, although I do find myself seeking out more Gothic type tales at this time of year, and I try to pick something a little seasonal around Christmas time so am open to suggestions for titles I should check out.

Is there a new release you’re still waiting for?

There’s a recent release that I haven’t read yet but am very much looking forward to and that’s The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton.
I also haven’t read the latest from Stephen King yet either.

What are three books you want to read before the end of the year?

  • The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal – I want to read this as I don’t read much sci-if and fancy a change. I recently finished the first of the Glamourist Histories by the same author and loved that so thought I’d check out her take on a different genre.
  • Perhaps another of the Glamourist Histories or another Invisible Library book by Genevieve Cogman.
  • I’d probably like to fit in at least one festive read, but don’t have a particular title in mind at the moment.

Is there a book you think could still shock you and become your favourite book of the year?

There have been quite a few books I’ve loved already this year. If I finally get around to reading The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow I do wonder whether that could be one I’d add to my favourites of the year.

Have you already started making reading plans for 2020?

Not even slightly! The usual Goodreads challenge goal may feature, but beyond that, no, not yet at least.


Are there any books you’re really hoping to read before the end of this year?
As always, feel free to consider yourself tagged if you fancy having a go at this one.

The Finally Fall Book Tag: 2020 Edition

Its Book Tag time. What better way to enjoy my favourite season than with an autumn themed tag? It’s Finally Fall! This tag was created by Alina on her booktube channel Tall Tales.

I’ve completed this tag a couple of times in the past but there’s always room for another autumn-themed post, so I thought I’d revisit it this year.

In fall, the air is crisp and clear: Name a book with a vivid setting.

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern had a vivid and magical setting.

Nature is beautiful… but also dying: Name a book that is beautifully written, but also deals with a heavy topic like loss or grief.

In The Sun Down Motel by Simone St. James it’s a sense of loss that drives Carly Kirk to venture to where her aunt inexplicably disappeared 35 years ago. She’s searching for answers and some kind of closure , but finds an incredibly creepy and possibly haunted motel in a town with far too many mysterious events in the past.

Fall is back to school season: Share a non-fiction book that taught you something new.

I feel like I give the same answer to this each time I do this tag but I haven’t read any non-fiction this year… yet.

In order to keep warm, it’s good to spend some time with the people we love: Name a fictional family/household/friend-group that you’d like to be a part of.

     

I’d love to go and spend some time adventuring with Vintage, Tor and Noon from the Winnowing Flame trilogy by Jen Williams.

Also, I’d like to tag along with the duo of Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde from Stoker’s Wilde by Steven Hopstaken and Melissa Prussi because even though they battle vampires and all manner of evil, it’s all done with humour, wit and style.

The colourful leaves are piling up on the ground: Show us a pile of fall-colored spines!

They’re not spines, but as it happens a recent Top Ten Tuesday post was all about autumn-themed book covers.

Fall is the perfect time for some storytelling by the fireside: Share a book wherein somebody is telling a story.

     

A couple of my recent reads…

Wakenhyrst by Michelle Paver. Maud Stearne is finally compelled to tell the story of shocking events that occurred at her childhood home, Wake’s End, years previously.

Endless Night by Agatha Christie. I picked this one up for Readers Imbibing Peril. It wasn’t quite what I was expecting but in it Michael Rogers tells the story of meeting his future wife and their time creating a new house and home together on land that may or may not be cursed.

The nights are getting darker: Share a dark, creepy read.

           

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson has some wonderfully creepy moments, and I also really enjoyed Dracul by Dacre Stoker and J. D. Barker. Both recommended for an Autumn night’s reading.

I must also mention The Sun Down Motel by Simone St. James. It’s my current read and some of the scenes at the motel are definitely creepy.

The days are getting colder: Name a short, heartwarming read that could warm up somebody’s cold and rainy day.

I recently discovered the pleasure of the read-in-one-sitting short story with The Sleep Tight Motel by Lisa Unger. Probably not what you’d call heartwarming, but it’s the perfect setting and subject for a cold, rainy day.

Fall returns every year: Name an old favorite that you’d like to return to soon.

I don’t re-read very often at all but seeing that Stuart Turton has a new book out makes me want to read that but also revisit The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle.

Every so often I also get the idea that I’d love to re-read the whole Dark Tower series by Stephen King but that’s eight books and some of them are really long so not sure it’s going to happen, for now at least.

Fall is the perfect time for cozy reading nights: Share your favorite cozy reading “accessories”!

A mug of tea, of possibly coffee, and some chocolate biscuits.

Spread the autumn appreciation and tag some people!

As always, if you’ve not had chance to do this tag yet, or you’re seeing it for the first time and fancy giving it a go please consider yourself tagged.

The Mid-Year Freak Out Book Tag: 2020 Edition

It’s Book Tag time.

It’s that time of year; I’ve spotted this tag around quite often recently so yes, the Mid-Year period is here again.
I’ve enjoyed many of my recent reads, so here’s to remembering a few of them in the Mid-Year Freak Out Book Tag!

1. Best book you’ve read so far in 2020:

I can’t possibly just choose one book for this as I’ve read so many great ones already this year. I must mention…

           

Dracul by Dacre Stoker and J. D. Barker
Stoker’s Wilde by Steven Hopstaken and Melissa Prusi
The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern
The Poison Song by Jen Williams

2. Best sequel of 2020 so far:


The Poison Song by Jen Williams. It’s the final book in the Winnowing Flame trilogy and such a great end to that series. The only sad thing about it is that there won’t be any further adventures with Vintage, Tor and Noon.

3. New release you haven’t read yet, but want to:

If It Bleeds by Stephen King. There’s not chance I’m not going to want to read the new Stephen King, and this one contains four stories, one of them featuring Holly Gibney, last seen in The Outsider.

4. Most anticipated release of the second half of 2020:

A Deadly Education by Naomi Novik
The Once and Future Witches by Alix E. Harrow
Piranesi by Susanna Clarke
The Devil and the Dark Water by Stuart Turton

5. Biggest disappointment of 2020:

That I have so many books I want to be reading right now and my reading pace cannot keep up. Bookwise I’ve enjoyed everything I’ve read so far this year so couldn’t really put a title for this answer.

6. Biggest surprise:

I was surprised how much I enjoyed reading The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe. It was included in the collection Darkness There and it made a nice change. I don’t tend to read poetry but I loved the lyrical tone and the gothic picture it painted. Not sure I’d read more poetry, you never know, but I’d definitely read more Poe.

7. Favourite new author (debut or new to you):

I really enjoyed Stoker’s Wilde by Steven Hopstaken and Melissa Prusi.

8. Newest fictional crush:

Why do I never manage to come up with anything for this answer? I must be missing out.

9. Newest favourite character:

Augustus McCrae from Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry. I can’t remember the last time I liked a character as much as I liked Gus.

10. Book that made you cry:

I know I’ve already mentioned both of these but The Poison Song by Jen Williams definitely had a moment or two, and I have a feeling there may be some upcoming scenes as I reach the final part of Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry too.

11. Book that made you happy:

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern provided some great escapism.

12. Favourite book to movie adaptation of 2020 you’ve seen:

I’m not sure I’ve seen one? Okay, does it count that I watched Locke and Key even though I’ve yet to read the graphic novel? That’s about all I can come up with at the moment.

13. Favourite Post/review you’ve written this year:

     

Dracul by Dacre Stoker and J. D. Barker, and Stoker’s Wilde by Steven Hopstaken and Melissa Prusi were both enjoyable to write about, and to read.
My Top Ten Tuesday wander through the TBR pile and Covers edition were quite fun to write too.

14. Most beautiful book you bought or received this year:

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern has a lovely cover and the story was whimsical and magical.

15. Books you need to read by the end of this year:

A small selection, because my TBR list/pile could fill a whole new post…

The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow
City of Brass by S. A. Chakraborty
If It Bleeds by Stephen King
NOS4A2 by Joe Hill

So concludes my 2020 edition of The Mid-Year Freak Out Book Tag.


As always, if you’ve not already done this and you fancy reminiscing over the amazing books you’ve read so far this year, feel free to consider yourself tagged.
See you next time for another Book Tag!

 

The End Of The Year Book Tag

It’s Book Tag time again!
I’ve seen this one around quite a lot recently and thought it would be fun to give it a try. So, let’s talk books…

Are there any books you started this year that you need to finish?

I’m just about to start a new read, which will no doubt be one of those mentioned in ‘three books you want to read before the end of the year’ further on in this tag, probably Angel Mage by Garth Nix, so hopefully I’ll finish that by the end of the year. I’d also like to read The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern.

Do you have an autumnal book to transition into the end of the year?

Not so much autumn into year-end, but I do usually pick up the latest Karen Swan novel around Christmas time. They’re something totally different to my usual reading choices and a nice way to wind down a year of reading.

Is there a new release you’re still waiting for?

Blood of Empire by Brian McClellan. It’s the final book in his latest trilogy and I really enjoyed the first two. I can’t wait to see what happens in the final chapter. The book is out at the beginning of December.

What are three books you want to read before the end of the year?

Angel Mage by Garth Nix
The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern
I’m not sure about a third choice, possibly something a little festive?

Is there a book you think could still shock you and become your favourite book of the year?

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern. It probably wouldn’t be a shock if I enjoy it as I loved The Night Circus so I was excited to hear about this book a few months ago. Having looked forward to reading it for that long I hope there are good things in store!

Have you already started making reading plans for 2020?

I haven’t at the moment. I read so many library books that my plans are often thrown when a few requested books all arrive at the same time and have to go straight to the top of my TBR pile.
I’ll probably set a GoodReads challenge goal, although based on the number of books I’ve read this year that will have to be quite low to start with.


Are there any books you’re really hoping to read before the end of this year? As always, feel free to consider yourself tagged if you fancy having a go at this one.

The Finally Fall Book Tag: 2019 Edition

Its Book Tag time. What better way to enjoy my favourite season than with an autumn themed tag? It’s Finally Fall! This tag was created by Alina on her booktube channel Tall Tales.

I completed this tag last year, but thought I’d revisit it now. I’m going to try and give answers only from books that I’ve read in the last year or so, even though it’s always so tempting to fall back on old favourites and give them yet another mention. I probably won’t be able to resist doing that at least once, but let’s see how I get on…

In fall, the air is crisp and clear: Name a book with a vivid setting.

       

The Winternight trilogy by Katherine Arden. I really enjoyed the story of Vasya and Morozko.

Nature is beautiful… but also dying: Name a book that is beautifully written, but also deals with a heavy topic like loss or grief.

A Boy and his Dog at the End of the World by C. A. Fletcher begins with the theft and loss of a beloved family pet and also touches on the absence of a sibling and being away from family. It’s a great story set in a bleak, broken world but it still has a hopeful tone.

Fall is back to school season: Share a non-fiction book that taught you something new.

I don’t think I’ve read any non-fiction so far this year!

In order to keep warm, it’s good to spend some time with the people we love: Name a fictional family/household/friend-group that you’d like to be a part of.

I would love a day with Aziraphale and Crowley from Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman, preferably not during the almost-apocalypse but just a regular day.

The colourful leaves are piling up on the ground: Show us a pile of fall-colored spines!

I’m still such an avid library user that I don’t have enough suitable books to show for this prompt, but it’s a great excuse to flash the wonderfully striking cover of The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon. Yellow’s definitely a colour for Autumn, right?!

Fall is the perfect time for some storytelling by the fireside: Share a book wherein somebody is telling a story.

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie is narrated by the local doctor, who recounts the story of meeting the great Poirot when he becomes involved in another murder mystery.

The nights are getting darker: Share a dark, creepy read.

The only one I’ve read so far this year is A Head Full of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay. It has a building sense of creepiness as the story of sisters Merry and Marjorie and the latter’s possible possession/illness goes on.

The days are getting colder: Name a short, heartwarming read that could warm up somebody’s cold and rainy day.

I can’t remember the last time I read anything short so I’ll have to go for the same title I chose last time for this one and say Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J. K. Rowling.

Fall returns every year: Name an old favorite that you’d like to return to soon.

     

I’m going in a slightly different direction with this one as I so rarely re-read books. I discovered the Charlie Parker series by John Connolly earlier this year. I’ve read the two latest books, The Woman in the Woods and A Book of Bones.  It’s definitely a series that I’d love to return to soon, and there are plenty of titles to check out.

Fall is the perfect time for cozy reading nights: Share your favorite cozy reading “accessories”!

A MASSIVE mug of tea and maybe a biscuit or two.
Comfortable cozy clothing and chunky socks.
A bookmark or two so I don’t end up folding page corners when I want to remember something I’ve just read (!)

Spread the autumn appreciation and tag some people!

As always, if you’ve not had chance to do this tag yet, or are now seeing it for the first time and fancying giving it a go please consider yourself tagged.

The Mid-Year Freak Out Book Tag: 2019 Edition

It’s Book Tag time.

It’s that time of year; I’ve spotted this tag around quite often recently so yes, the Mid-Year period is here again.
I’ve enjoyed many of my recent reads, so here’s to remembering a few of them in the Mid-Year Freak Out Book Tag!

1. Best book you’ve read so far in 2019:

I can’t choose just one, but I’ll try not to be excessive and just go for these three…

           

The Woman in the Woods by John Connolly
A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World by C. A. Fletcher
The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon

2. Best sequel of 2019 so far:


The Winter of the Witch by Katherine Arden. What a wonderful conclusion to the Winternight trilogy. I could read the whole series again if I was a re-reader because I enjoyed it so much.

3. New release you haven’t read yet, but want to:

The Poison Song by Jen Williams is the final book in the Winnowing Flame trilogy. I can’t not find out how it ends having enjoyed the two previous book so much.

4. Most anticipated release of the second half of 2019:

The Institute by Stephen King. I’ll always pick up the latest from Stephen King.

5. Biggest disappointment of 2019:

I’d rather call it books that in the end just weren’t for me and I’d go for The Furies by Katie Lowe.

6. Biggest surprise:

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie. Did you see that twist coming? No, neither did I. It was so surprising that I don’t think I’ll forget it.

7. Favourite new author (debut or new to you):

John Connolly. I joined the Charlie Parker series very late (book 16 actually!). I have no idea how this series has passed me by for so long, and I’m really looking forward to discovering older books from the series.

8. Newest fictional crush:

I’m obviously missing out on something here because sit and think as I might I’m drawing a blank on this answer. Help!

9. Newest favourite character:

Charlie Parker and Louis made a great team in The Woman in the Woods by John Connolly.

10. Book that made you cry:

The Winter of the Witch by Katherine Arden may have caused a tear or two.

11. Book that made you happy:

I really enjoyed the whole Winternight trilogy by Katherine Arden.

12. Favourite book to movie adaptation of 2019 you’ve seen:

I have to say Good Omens even though it doesn’t quite fit the category as I’ve not actually read the book yet. The tv series has made me request the book from the library and I can’t wait to read it. It’s just so different.

13. Favourite Post/review you’ve written this year:

My Top Ten Tuesday From Page to Screen post, thinking about books I’d love to see adapted. Also the Things That Make Me Pick Up A Book post.
The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon was fun to write about, as was The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie, because it was so hard not to just give all the secrets away!

14. Most beautiful book you bought or received this year:

     

I would say this one is a tie between The Winter of the Witch by Katherine Arden and The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon, which features a pretty fierce dragon on the cover.

15. Books you need to read by the end of this year:

If I listed everything I’d like to read soon this tag would never end, so here’s just a small selection…

More  from the Charlie Parker series by John Connolly
The Institute by Stephen King
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman

And so concludes my 2019 edition of The Mid-Year Freak Out Book Tag.


As always, if you’ve not already done this and you fancy reminiscing over the amazing books you’ve read so far this year, feel free to consider yourself tagged.
See you next time for another Book Tag!

 

The Spring Cleaning Book Tag

It’s time for another Book Tag.
Thanks to Kelsey of There’s Something About KM for tagging me for this one.

It’s taken me a while to write my answers, and I wanted to get this posted before Spring departs for another year, so here we go…

THE STRUGGLE OF GETTING STARTED: A BOOK OR SERIES YOU STRUGGLE TO BEGIN BECAUSE OF ITS SIZE

The most recent read that comes to mind is The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon. Anyone who’s read my blog recently may have noted my amazement when I collected this book from the library. I had no idea how huge it was when I ordered it, and it was so heavy that I knew it would have to be good to warrant carrying it around for as long as it would take to read. I’m so very glad that I didn’t hesitate too long, because once I started I was totally hooked. Such a brilliant story.

CLEANING OUT THE CLOSET: A BOOK OR SERIES YOU WANT TO UNHAUL

Unhaul? Get rid of books unread? I really need to master the art of this, especially when it comes to library books because my pile is absolutely massive.

OPENING WINDOWS AND LETTING FRESH AIR IN: A BOOK THAT WAS REFRESHING

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie. I still can’t believe that twist! I won’t say too much more for fear of spoiling anything for someone who has yet to read the book, because once you know, I think it’s one you’ll always remember, and that’s definitely refreshing.

WASHING OUT THE SHEETS: A BOOK WITH A SCENE YOU WISH YOU COULD REWRITE

Without giving anything away, I remember thinking I maybe would have switched the order of the final two chapters of Someone Like Me by M. R. Carey, so not rewritten, just re-placed.

THROWING OUT UNNECESSARY KNICKKNACKS: A BOOK IN A SERIES YOU DIDN’T THINK WAS NECESSARY

This is a tough one. I don’t actually think I’ve read enough complete series to offer an answer. I’m reading A Song of Ice and Fire by George R. R. Martin, and I’ve enjoyed everything so far, and the same goes for The Dark Tower series by Stephen King.

POLISHING DOORKNOBS: A BOOK THAT HAD A CLEAN FINISH

I’ll say The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon, as it was a whole one-volume epic fantasy tale of fierce ladies and talking dragons. That’s not to say I’m happy with just the one volume – I would absolutely love a return to that world and those characters.

REACHING TO DUST THE FAN: A BOOK THAT TRIED TOO HARD TO RELAY A CERTAIN MESSAGE

I’m honestly not sure. I must admit if I see a number of reviews that mention this sort of thing it may be enough to put me off picking up the book in the first place, it depends on my mood at the time.

THE TIRING YET SATISFYING FINISH OF SPRING CLEANING: A BOOK SERIES THAT WAS TIRING BUT SATISFYING TO GET THROUGH

The Dark Tower series by Stephen King. It was tiring in that it literally kept me up because I just HAD to read one more chapter (of course!), and also tiring emotionally because over a long series of long books you can’t help but become attached to the characters and when things don’t go well for them it’s just not good. I really must re-read this series sometime.


So concludes the Spring Cleaning Book Tag.
As always, if you fancy having a go, or in this case can’t face the thought of any actual real life s
pring cleaning, consider yourself tagged – spending time amongst your books is much more fun anyway!

The Spring Has Sprung Book Tag – 2019 Edition

It’s Book Tag time!
Spring has arrived, so, you guessed it – it’s time for me to bring out the Spring Has Sprung Book Tag for a 2019 update!…
I know I was tagged for this one a couple of years back, and from that point it has become something of a little tradition to update my answers each year. On to the books…

1. FLOWERS: LOOK ON YOUR BOOKSHELVES. WHAT IS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL BOOK BOTH INSIDE AND OUT?

   

The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon. Have you SEEN that cover?! It’s embossed, and it has the most fierce looking dragon, and the colours are gorgeous. You may get the impression that I like it, and you’d be right.
And the story? Well, the book is so huge that I said when it arrived at the library it had better be good or it would be going back, because I couldn’t see myself lugging something so massive around if it wasn’t great.
I couldn’t put it down!

I also have to mention The Winter of the Witch by Katherine Arden. Loved the story, loved the cover, loved the whole series!

2. GRASS: WHAT IS A BOOK THAT YOU FIND THAT OTHERS LIKE WAY MORE THAN YOU DO?

Tough question – I don’t seem to encounter many people who read the same sort of books that I like. I’ll have to give this one some thought…

3. RAIN: WHAT’S A GREAT BOOK THAT LIFTS YOUR SPIRITS WHEN YOU’RE DOWN?

P. G. Wodehouse novels are usually good for a moment of humour.

4. DEW: WHAT’S A BOOK THAT MADE YOU FEEL ALIVE?

I loved Wrath of Empire by Brian McClellan. All the Powder Mage books have been really good, and this latest addition to that world continued in the same way. I think there’s another book out later this year, so that’s something to look out for.

5. STORMS: WHAT’S A BOOK THAT YOU FOUND UNPREDICTABLE?

Someone Like Me by M. R. Carey. It was such a different read, and such a strange situation for some of the characters that I had no idea which way the story would go, and that made it exciting.

6. RAINBOW: WHAT WAS A BOOK THAT YOU STRUGGLED WITH, ONLY TO BE HAPPY THAT YOU READ IT IN THE END?

I sat here and gave this some thought, but then realised it’s going to have to be a similar answer to last year. My TBR pile is almost as tall as me so I don’t really like to sit struggling through a book I’m not enjoying. I’m even trying to get a little bit better at DNF-ing quicker these days, although I do still find it hard to put a book aside once I’ve started reading it.

7. CHILLY WEATHER: WHAT’S A BOOK THAT YOU COULDN’T FINISH OR DIDN’T ENJOY?

The Binding by Bridget Collins. I just couldn’t seem to get into it, but passed it on to someone else and she loved it, so maybe it was just me at the time?

8. WARM WEATHER: WHAT’S A BOOK THAT YOU LOVED AND WANTED MORE OF?

         

The Winter of the Witch by Katherine Arden, or actually, the whole Winternight trilogy! Yes, there are three whole books, but I feel like I could read about Vasya and Morozko for at least another three books.

9. GREEN: WHAT’S A BOOK THAT YOU HAVEN’T READ YET, BUT REALLY WANT TO?

Circe by Madeline Miller. Scrolling online the other day I came across a quote from the book, and it was so lyrical. If the rest of the book is written in the same way then I really do need to give it a place at the top of my TBR pile.

10. PINK: WHAT’S A BOOK IN WHICH YOU FELT A STRONG CONNECTION TO THE CHARACTERS?

I love the three main characters in The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon. They’re all very different, but all have their strengths and their trials. Sometimes I find myself longing to get back to a certain character’s perspective when I‘m reading a long novel, but in this I found I enjoyed them all equally.

11. PURPLE: WHAT’S A BOOK THAT WHEN YOU READ IT, YOU FEEL SAFE?

Last year I mentioned my Harry Potter series re-read, and it’s something that I really want to carry on with, because I still think there’s something comforting about reading a well-loved and well-known series for the second time, even when you know what lies in store for some of the characters, because you now how it turns out in the end.

12. ORANGE: WHAT BOOK DO YOU FEEL IS INTELLIGENTLY WRITTEN?

The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton. That book must have been so intricately planned because there are so many threads going back and forth that you really have to pay attention to keep up. It was probably my favourite read of last year, and I would love to read it again in the future.

13. YELLOW: WHAT BOOK PUTS A SMILE ON YOUR FACE?

       

I am really enjoying Agatha Christie at the moment. I love the Poirot novels, and the ones with Hastings narrating usually have something a little comic in the way he relates events.


So, there’s my latest edition of Spring Has Sprung.
As always, if you want to have a go at the tag then consider yourself tagged. Enjoy!